Timber Harvest Schedule

With a new year comes a new harvest schedule for the OSU Research Forests, and we want to do our best to keep you up to date regarding upcoming harvests and associated road and trail closures. The Harvest Schedule Table features the name, acreage, type, method, timing, and research applications of each harvest, as well as any impacts to recreation. Maps of the McDonald and Dunn Forests highlight where each harvest will be taking place this year. Additional information about each harvest closure will be sent out just before it starts to help you plan your trips onto the Forests.

Stay tuned for the new Interactive Forest Webmap, coming soon to the OSU Research Forests’ webpage. This map will contain information about current and upcoming harvests on the McDonald and Dunn Forests. You will be able to check the status of the harvest, and which trails and roads are impacted. But wait, there’s more! On this map you’ll also be able to locate trailhead kiosks, along with their facilities.

Overall, 6.7 million board feet will be harvested from the McDonald and Dunn Forests in 2019, and sold to lumber mills in the Pacific Northwest. The revenue will be used to manage OSU Research Forests, support College of Forestry student learning, and contribute toward the new College of Forestry Oregon Forest Science Complex on campus.

As the core source of funding for the OSU Research Forests, timber harvests

  • provide revenue to the OSU Research Forests and the College of Forestry. This money keeps our programs running, including construction and maintenance of the trails and facilities that you enjoy. The rest funds the College of Forestry’s operations, including education, infrastructure, and student opportunities.
  • provide opportunities for research; for foresters, civil engineers, wildlife specialists, ecologists, silviculturists, social scientists, and more.
  • are a part of managing forest health. About half of our har-vests this year are tackling insect/drought problems in our for-ests. By coupling forest health with revenue production, we reduce costs and the number of harvests and closures on the forest.

For more information on why we harvest timber on the OSU Research Forests, take a look at our Winter 2016 Newsletter, which features an article from Forest Manager, Brent Klumph, regarding our Timber Management Program and an article by former student worker, Blair Ruffing, describing timber management from a newbie’s perspective.

Felling, Hauling, and Your Safety

Timber harvest hazards include falling limbs and trees and the use of heavy equipment, making it necessary to close these areas to the public. Forest closures will be actively enforced in cooperation with Benton County Sheriff’s Office. Harvest operations are extremely dangerous, so it is important that visitors respect posted forest closures for their safety and the safety of the crews.

To reduce travel time and resources, it is necessary for trucks to use some of the same popular forest roads and gates as people. Visitors should expect to encounter, and yield to, log and passenger trucks on forest roads.

Resources