Firefighters Shelter
Facilities and Features

Arboretum Trails: Peavy Arboretum provides a number of short, wide, and generally flat walking paths weaving through trees native to the Pacific Northwest, as well as trees from other parts of the world. Walk through a grove of giant sequoias, admire the towering western red cedars along Redcedar Run Trail, sit and quietly observe the aquatic life at Randal Pond, and stroll through a field of camas which blooms purple in April and May. Trees are marked with identification posts so you can learn a little bit while you’re having some fun. For a more educational experience, print this brochure to take a self-guided tour and learn about the history of Peavy Arboretum and the trees growing here! 

Peavy Lodge: Peavy Lodge is not currently available for event rental.

Firefigther Memorial Shelter: The Firefighter Memorial Shelter and surrounding pines are dedicated to all who work to protect our forest resources. The Willamette Valley ponderosa pines surrounding the shelter commemorate the nine young Oregon firefighters who died fighting the South Canyon Fire in Colorado in 1994.  

The Firefighter Memorial Shelter is a 45' wide open air shelter with four picnic tables inside. The shelter is a great place to gather with family, meet for a small educational event, or just to sit and watch the rain. While enjoying your time at the shelter, please follow these guidelines:

  • No reservations. Groups are welcome to use the shelter on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • Occupancy time limit – 4 hours. Please limit your stay to four hours (including set up and take down).
  • Forest hours – 5:00am to 9:00pm.
  • Maximum group size – 50 people.
  • Walk in access only. Motorized access to the shelter through the meadow or along the trail is absolutely prohibited.
  • Low profile events. Please keep decorations minimal and consistent with the natural setting. No catering or delivery of additional porta-potties on-site. Generators and sound systems are not allowed.
  • Alcohol is prohibited.
  • No fires. Including barbeques, smoking, fireworks, or other open flame
  • No shooting.
  • Follow all OSU Research Forests Rules

Forestry Club Cabin: The Forestry Club Cabin is located about a half mile uphill along the 500 Road from Peavy Arboretum. Constructed with student labor, the first Forestry Club meeting was held there December 2, 1925. In February 1949, that cabin burned to the ground after a fraternity dance. Another student crew, led by Marvin Rowley, quickly rebuilt the cabin on the same site. The cabin underwent a remodel in 2015 and 2016, and is now frequently used for College of Forestry related events. The Forestry Club Cabin is not available for public rental.

Cronemiller Lake: this 1- acre lake was created in 1937 by the Civilian Conservation Corps to serve as an irrigation pond for the Oregon Forest Nursery. This lake has become a favorite destination for many who visit the Peavy Arboretum and is a great place to watch wildlife on quiet days.

Logging Sports Arena: The OSU Logging Sports Team practices and hosts logging sports events at the George Brown Sports Arena, located at the north end of Cronemiller Lake.

Pole Farm: The pole farm was founded by Professor T.J. Starker in 1928, and is one of the longest-running and largest utility pole preservative treatment projects in the U.S., as well as the oldest research project on the OSU Research Forests. To reduce decay and insect damage, existing utility poles are periodically treated with wood preserving chemicals. At the pole farm, OSU researchers test different preservatives for their effectiveness, longevity, and environmental impact. This knowledge allows companies to use the least amount of chemical at the lowest frequency while obtaining optimal results. This research also informs climatic considerations, which vary by region and significantly affect how much preservative is needed to treat a pole. As you can imagine, a pole in rainy Western Oregon will need more protection than a pole in Oregon’s drier eastern side. Besides utility pole research, the farm is also used for testing wood treatments for decks, railroad ties, buildings, and other wood products.